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20121223
20121223
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of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or the hundreds of books on washington. my thought was, why not look at that person in it than the best, the first ladies? historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as they have largely ignored the role of -- in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians most historians is that we say were not educated in matters of the heart. so therefore canon's crowns and kings are what folks focus on. in setting the first lady's for example the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days on the south side of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he missed her. she was pregnant and she had a miscarriage. he missed her and he boug
neil barofsky talks about his book, bail out an inside account of how washington amended main street while rescuing wall street. he argues that the 700 billion-dollar troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. bailout fund was mishandled. it's about 40 minutes. >> joining us now is neil barofsky, former inspector general for t.a.r.p.. you saw him earlier on the panel. here's the cover of his bestseller. it's called bailout. .. >> i was nominated by my boss, and it was this crazy whirlwind when i had that conversation and was serving. >> what was the date he that you started? >> december 15, 2008. >> what are your politics? you the bush administration, essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to go. vote. i have always been a registered democrat. it is actually kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approach me and asked me if i was interested in the job, i was going to different excuses as to why didn't want to go to washington. i was very happy being with a prosecutor. i was getting married. finally, when all those argu
service in the american revolution. he was a general of engineers under george washington and his many of you know, he designed the fortifications at west point. his payment was very long delayed and he finally got it in 1795 your in philadelphia he watches his good friend jefferson, and said would you write a will with me? and he may jefferson the executor. and after they drafted the formal, before they drafted a formal document, he had written something out in his own hand, and i would like to read this to you in conclusion. i bade mr. jefferson that in case i should die without will he should buy out of my money many negroes and free them. that remaining sons should be sufficient to give them education and provide for their means. that is to say, each should know beforehand the duty of a citizen in the free government, that he must defend his country against foreign as well as internal enemies, to have good and human hearts, sensible to the sufferings of others. each one must be married and have 100 acres of land with instruments, cattle for tillage and not to manage and govern as w
nobel prize winners among us 21 authors. .. >> if you want to mess with washington, d.c., go ahead. that's absolutely fine. but -- [laughter] but i've been living in washington, d.c. for a long time and watching policy debates go on. and i've never seen a president that was as down in the weeds secretly as president bush is. and i just wanted to start with a little anecdote that, actually, i think the 4% solution was visible back then, but way long, long ago in the early years of president bush's administration, he called a bunch of nobel prize-winning economists into the white house to meet x it was my very first time seeing president bush, and i think it was the roosevelt room, it might have been. and i was very nervous, of course, and i wondered what the heck am i doing amongst all these great economistses, and then i wondered what president bush was like. and right at the beginning of the meeting he started requesting questions that had been bugging him about moral hazard of very technological issue. when he came up to washington, he was a policy wonk too. and that's why the bush ins
to write the book. i had a law practice here in washington for many, many years. i did keep notes, and i felt ultimately, um, that i would put it together, and i'd piece it together for a magazine article. and then it expanded, and it became what it is right now. but always behind in my mind i want young people to know, i want young people to know that this ugliness happened. and so it took a while. my brother is a writer up in new york, and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife back into my first year legal research because i had to certify, authorize this was a piece of nonfiction, and you have to put down. i felt with a memoir you could just wig it. well, you can't because once you start highlighting things, you have to get authority for it. you even have to get a concept from people who you put photographs in, the consent of the army, consent of all -- i had a letter from james meredith right after i left which is in the book it, and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, well, you need his permission. i didn't need his
been immersed in the politics of washington washington from one in the pennsylvania avenue to the other, we have never seen it this dysfunctional. the dysfunction is that a critical mass and we felt we had to speak out about how the problem is and is the book says even worse than it looks. it never looks good and we have to talk about who is at fault in what we can do to get out of it. half the book is about how we been get out of this mess. >> the argument basically is twofold. one, we have now polarized political parties. internally, homogeneous, very much at loggerheads, much like elementary parties, the eminently oppositional. they have to work in a constitutional system based on separation of powers and checks and balances. the mismatch between our parties and our governing institutions is problem number one. problem number two, which is the toughest thing for us to say, and for many people to hear, is that the parties are not equally implicated in this. we have something called asymmetric polarization in which the republican party has in recent years become almost a radical insurg
to washington, d.c. on the congressional hearing that there may be a very long line if it is a popular hearing. and you may not like standing in long lines you can now go to a company called line standing dhaka, and pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone usually a homeless person or someone that needs to work to hold the place on line for hours and hours overnight if need be. and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing by the way, if you would rather sit in an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. a longstanding dhaka, or suppose you want to contribute to a alleviating a social tragedy in this country. each year thousands of babies born to a drug-addicted mothers there is a charity you can contribute to that tries to use a market mechanism to solve this terrible problem. they offered any and drug addicted woman $300 to be sterilized. the use of the market incentive. or suppose you have a new drug let's say you are a pharmaceutical company. you have a new drug that you want to
eisenhower. he's introduced by susan eisenhower, granddaughter at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> what an honor and treat to be at the eisenhower institute and especially an honor to have susan introduced me. you know, families can be a little touchy about the great man and their family, but the eisenhower's were amazing with me. john, susan, david are completely open, not defensive, which is unusual. incredibly helpful and i could not have done this book without them. so thank you, susan. six weeks after dwight eisenhower became president, stalin died. paik caught together top advisers and officials in that, what's the plan? .. is >> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the conference, when ik
. shriver opposed the reordering of priorities generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote, like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 to 1968, one-third of america's poor moved up word out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities lead shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in a stormy chicago, shriver's name and came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on the flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family still grieving from the recent death of robert raised an objective in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success and repairing the alliance with france weekend by a disagreement about the vietnam war had prompted president nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when the democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of el
eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier o
& prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just give you a quick sense
sides of these issues and then we discuss them. >> host: dear ms. washington? >> guest: i miss the little bit of power you have when you're a government office because no matter how small the agency and how miniscule the power, when people at goblins, you can sometimes help them. as far as the commission is concerned, i miss being able to bring people who no one heard from, no one would listen to and listen to what they have to say. >> host: is is your third, fourth book? >> guest: know, i've written many more books than not. probably nine or 10 books. >> host: is there another one coming? >> guest: another one right now. the topic is what does it mean mean -- it is on voter fraud. i found documents from a place in louisiana of all places, where they seem to have had a persistent record of voter fraud from an 18th century until now. it's bipartisan and so i was given some record from the voter fraud that goes down there that no one else has. and so i've been reading them. so this book would be if you really want to see voter suppression, here is voter suppression. >> host: when
of the things that government does. simplify the tax code for tax complexity has washington revolves around it. they lose the power for the brainpower to doing productive things. and so yes, the thing to remember about spending if the money doesn't come from the head. it comes from you. you spit it out to politically favored constituent groups. that's not stimulus, more like waste. >> host: just go back to your original point, would you like to see no floating currencies. we had it for 180 years. it provides stability and value is 60 minutes, 16 ounces in a pound. so it doesn't restrict money supplied to have a vibrant economy of blossoms. a stagnant economy stays stagnant. what it means is if you make a contract to years from now that a fixed amount of dollars from the value of the dollar to years of the same messages today. when you make an investment company you are in effect when you value that investment is the future stream of income and net present value. so if your facebook shoes because you think it's going to pretend times in the next five years, you don't know what the dollars going
washington post" which rarely had much positive to say about the next demonstration of minute that she had quote threaded her way among all potential sources of trouble admirably and with skill. epitomizing the simple human response acquired by the the strategy the strategy of the editorials continue. she succeeded in communicating to the prevention that a genuine desire to help and to have done so with great tact for all of which he deserves much credit. if a chip to peru show the potential for a goodwill ambassador, her church the following year to africa despite her determination to break through the restraints of her first lady role. in early january 1972, pat set out on an eight day, 10,000-mile trip to the african continent where she visited liberia, and the ivory coast. the primary mission of the trip was to participate in the inauguration of william holden the new president of liberia. for the first time the first lady would be the official representative of the united states. as such, pat private -- as well as prime minister busey and edward auto of ghana and president felix coe
the attention to washington or albany o or city hall but we have the power to exercise pressure demand influence on elective officials. we have to get much more active to have a city to respond to the rate of child poverty we should be shamed and nation the strong and kids in poverty don't have the access to success with material and that is the completeness to address and when kids stand up and they say the words liberty and justice for all that it should be a command with a compelling aspiration and to make that real but we are lacking that sense of urgency when i think of great movements in america we were not led by a officials to respond to the leadership in the ground. when we think of voting conversations had rehab and entire presidential debate and the word party is not what we should talk about? i hope we can change the dialogue. i would like to do a balance sheet analysis of the country. the manhattan institute works with us with the balance sheet analysis for every $1 spent on staff it is a multiplier effect. about $1.70 of job creation and also with programs for kids. it produces an
marketplace mentioned the best of lists are coming out by publications "washington post," the economist, et cetera have been abrogated at booktv.org. you'll be able to see a lot of the best of 2012 books list. they are under our section called news about books. pulitzers this year, stephen greenblatt won for general nonfiction this word history delete many maribel, one for malcolm x and biography or autobiography. john lewis gaddis, george f. kennan and american life. what is this word about? >> guest: to swerve if i remember right, i admit i dipped into the book when it came out. it's fascinating. it was a little on the side of being i don't want to say -- intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. that is about a palm. help me here. do you remember the name of the palm? we are funky and this exam here. rediscovered in the renaissance and then it changed the way it was published i guess you would say. printed or something. >> host: i didn't mean to but she was the spot there. >> guest: the cultures where did that and put in more modern take on life and the fear of dying is to put
of time life looks, writes regularly for "the washington post" and our web site is rachel cox.com -- >> rachel as cox. >> rachel s. cox.com, sorry about that, and this is her first book, "into dust and fire" five young americans who went to fight the nazi army. this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about a programming this weekend. you can tweet us of booktv. >> this is the cover of john goodman's newest book called "priceless" curing the health care crisis. booktv is some acacia net freedomfest in las vegas and dr. john goodman joins us now to talk about "priceless." dr. goodman lets start by asking you about the recent supreme court decision on the health care bill. what is your view of? >> i was sorry to see that decision. i wish the court had thrown out upon the care and we could start over and have a more rational health care reform. now we are going to have to deal with the law as it is and i think though even the supporters of the law are going to want to make major changes within and next year and to have. >> okay, let's start. what do you see as rationa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17